School Garden Goes Public

St John of Beverly Roman Catholic Primary School, Yorkshire, is one of only a handful of schools across the country to be listed in the National Garden Scheme’s (NGS). Pupils at the school are very excited about this recognition of their efforts.

St John's has embraced gardening fully into their curriculum. Inspired by Assistant Headteacher Jonathan Roe the school has developed an Organic Vegetable Garden, a Wildlife Garden, a Peace Garden, a small orchard, a polythene tunnel for sub-tropical vegetables as well as a World War 2 Garden complete with Anderson Shelter.

This school's garden illustrates the enthusiasm of the younger generation 'to grow' and learn in an outdoor environment. They have achieved benchmark level 4 in the RHS Campaign for School Gardening, which is supported by Waitrose, and are hoping to achieve the top level 5 before long. In 2010 they first won the Beverley in Bloom Gold Award (Educational Endeavour), then went on to win the Yorkshire Rose Gold Award and Best in Category (Young People's Award) at the Yorkshire in Bloom awards.

"Being listed in The Yellow Book is fantastic recognition of the hard work our pupils, their parents and our staff have carried out," says Theresa Rogerson, Headteacher of St John's. "Gardening has brought so many benefits including encouraging pupils to work together and it makes many of the school subjects such as reading, writing, science and number work more understandable as we use practical exercises that helps pupils realise how important these subjects are."

"I have worked with pupils and teachers of St John's for two years," says John Hickling, Regional Advisor for the RHS Campaign for School Gardening. "They have been great to work with and I am so pleased that they decided to open their fantastic garden to the public. I just know many people will benefit from visiting their garden." The children will give guided tours, horticultural demonstrations and offer gardening activities.

Money raised from the National Garden Scheme goes to charity. Macmillan Cancer Support and Marie Curie are amongst the charities that benefit.

 
 

Article posted on 17 May 2011.